Tag Archives: History

V is for Veggies

One of my favorite dishes is veggies and rice … or veggies and cheese … or veggies and eggs … or just plain veggies.

Veggies Dinner CloseFor those of you for whom gardening is like breathing; walking outside and picking a clean dishpan full of onions, peppers, okra, corn and tomatoes is the first step in preparing any summertime meal.

Unfortunately, I am not a particularly successful gardener, but I have been spoiled by the bounty of – and learned many lessons from – gardens tended and loved by Aunt Betty, Isabelle and of course, Mona. SAM_1021

As I wash the radishes and slice the onions, I revisit those fragrant gardens of the women who guided me; who shared their quiet strength and immeasurable beauty through their actions; who loved me and taught me and rolled their eyes when I pulled up perfectly good plants, mistaking those oval leaves for mere weeds –again.

If you have a gardener’s soul, know that you are treasured by those of us who cannot grow a vegetable garden so lovely it becomes a wonderland of color and flavor and scent.

Thank you.

 

U is for Ugali

With a dash of cornmeal and a splash of water, you can enjoy the flavor of South Africa.

This simple recipe is known by many names depending up where you might be at mealtime, but in Kenya, ugali is the familiar name of this staple.

As you will learn from the following links, the cooked cornmeal is supposed to have a stiff, almost putty-like consistency:

http://allthingskenyan.com/countries/kenya/ugali-recipe

http://www.congocookbook.com/staple_dish_recipes/ugali.html

Unfortunately, I had far less cornmeal on hand than needed, so ended up with a porridge rather than a dough suitable for scooping some stew or picking up meat from a dish. I’ve opted to share my attempt with you anyway.

Bring 2 cups water to a boil. Add 1 cup cornmeal.

Stir constantly to avoid lumps. I used a whisk vigorously, but still had some lumps.

I spooned the thick porridge into bowls, knowing that it should have been much more dense and malleable when cooked.

Although I didn’t quite succeed at making ugali, I have learned about a basic food that might be new to me, but has been a part of countless meals for many generations.

I plan to try this recipe again and will share my (hopefully) much improved results with you then!

Q is for Quilt Cookies

As part of the Indiana Bicentennial, many communities throughout the state are making quilts, hosting quilt shows, and offering classes to those unfamiliar with quilting.

Knowing that Scout groups, teachers, civic clubs and families often look for kid-friendly ways to incorporate history and the arts into their meetings or lesson plans, I thought it might be fun to make edible quilts. A tasty lesson is no less a lesson!

Q Cookies Store

Although the same idea can be applied to cupcakes, sheet or round cakes, this ‘recipe’ is for cookies. And considering how … challenging … the implementation of these great ideas can become when working with younger children, this particular approach is very easy and pretty cheap.

Before starting, you will need:

 

Store brand sugar cookies – try to buy at least three times as many cookies as there are children in order to offset nibbling, breakage, disasters, etc. And it might be helpful to use larger cookies so they will have more space with which to work.

Assorted colors of frosting – the pre-made/packaged tubes are convenient, but can get pricey when dealing with a larger group.

One option is to divide your favorite frosting recipe into as many colors as you have time, children, and imagination. Fill individual sandwich bags with each color, then snip the tip off, making a small opening for the frosting.

Working with cookies flipped top side down to use the flatter, smoother side of the cookie, draw a grid or pattern with one color frosting.

Q Cookies Frosted

 

Allow to set, then fill with colored frosting.

TahDah – it is now time to eat your quilt!

 

 

 

 

 

 

E is for Eggs

Fresh eggs – the stuff of meringue, omelets. souffles. The stuff of culinary adventure.

Eggs Carton

Scotch eggs, Thousand Year eggs, Chocolate eggs, Deviled eggs … the variations are endless. With some spice and imagination, anything is possible.

Spices

The art of boiling eggs is debated in some kitchens …

Boil too long – an unattractive green ring appears around the yolk.

Ice down too soon – gooey yuck instead of cooked yolk.

Some people in some kitchens claim it is all in the careful timing – 3 minutes, I think.

Some people are probably right.

Scrambled, fried, poached, boiled …  within a few minutes, everyone at the breakfast table can be happy.

Eggs Variety Plated AM 2

Even the eggs!

Eggs Happy Face

Sweet Tea Reads

The joy is in the doing - the mixing and the measuring and the sauteing and the ...

Mrs. Twinkle

My Wonderful Little World

Everydayhero

life & travel / vida & viajes